Download Service Manuals for Johnson & Evinrude Outboard Engines in Seconds!


 

DOWNLOAD JOHNSON & EVINRUDE OUTBOARD SERVICE MANUALS

 

1958-1972 Johnson Evinrude 50HP thru 125HP Repair Manual

1965-1978 Johnson Evinrude 1.5 to 35 HP Service Repair Manual

1973 1990 Johnson Evinrude 2 to 40 HP Service Manual 2/4-Stroke Outboard

1973-1990 Johnson Evinrude Outboard 48 - 235 HP Workshop Manual 2/4-STROKE

1990-2001 Johnson Evinrude Outboard 1.25 HP To 70 HP Manual 2/4-Stroke

1992 2001 JOHNSON EVINRUDE 65 to 300 HP Workshop Manual 2 & 4 STROKE

2007 Johnson Evinrude 30 HP Service Manual 4-STROKE

2007 Johnson Evinrude 25 HP Service Manual 4-STROKE

2007 Johnson Evinrude 9 HP - 15 HP  Service Manual 4-STROKE

2007 Johnson Evinrude 9 HP - 15 HP  Service Manual 2-STROKE

2007 Johnson Evinrude 2.5 HP Service Manual 4-STROKE

2007 Evinrude 115, 150, 175, 200 HP 60 degrees V models Service Manual 2-STROKE

2007 Evinrude 75, 90 HP Service Repair Manual 2-STROKE

2007 Johnson 4, 5, 6 HP Service Repair Manual 4-STROKE

2007 Evinrude 40, 50, 60 HP Service Repair Manual

2007 Evinrude 200, 225, 250 HP Service Repair Manual


The Johnson-Evinrude Workshop manual downloads for the above listed models describes the service procedures for the complete vehicle. Follow the Maintenance Schedule recommendations to ensure that the outboard is in peak operating condition. Performing the scheduled maintenance is very important. It compensates for the initial wear that occurs during the life of the outboard motor.
 
All chapters in the Workshop Manual apply to the whole vehicle and illustrates procedures for removal/installation of components that are in detailed step-by-step fashion.
 
Most all Workshop manual chapters start with an assembly or system illustration, diagrams, exploded parts view, pictures, service information and troubleshooting for the section. The subsequent pages give detailed procedures.



Fuel Pumps
General Information
Fuel Pump Description/Operation
Testing
Troubleshooting Fuel Pump
Fuel Pump Components
Fuel Pump Removal/Installation
Fuel Pump Cleaning, Inspection, Disassembly and Reassembly
Fuel Pump – Cleaning/Inspection
Check Valve Reassembly
Carburetion
Fuel System Troubleshooting
Checking for Restricted Fuel Flow Caused by Anti-Siphon Valves
Fuel System (Carburetor)
Fuel System (Linkage)
Carburetor Adjustments
Initial Starting Adjustment
Low Speed Mixture Adjustment
Carburetor Float Adjustment
Specification Sheet - WME Carburetors
Carburetor Fastener Torques
Settings
Fuel Pump Specifications
Fuel Pump Pressure
Sealants
Idle Speed Adjustment
Main (High Speed) Jet Adjustment
Rejetting Carburetors For High Altitude Operation
Jet Orifice Size/Part Number Chart
Carburetor Removal and Disassembly
Carburetor Disassembly
Cleaning and Inspection
Carburetor Reassembly
Idle Air Screw
Enrichener System
Enrichener Valve Hose Installation
Enrichener Valve Test
Acceleration Pump Fuel Flow Circuit
Fuel Tank
Fuel Tank Components
Fuel Line and Primer Bulb Assembly
Fuel Line Clamp Removal and Installation

Fuel Pumps
General Information
FUEL PUMP DESCRIPTION/OPERATION
The fuel pump is a crankcase-pressure-operated, diaphragm-
type pump. Crankcase pulsating pressure
(created by the up-and-down movement of piston) is
transferred to fuel pump by way of a passage (hole)
between crankcase and fuel pump.
When piston is in an upward motion, a vacuum is
created in the crankcase, thus pulling in a fuel/air mixture
(from carburetor) into crankcase. This vacuum
also pulls in on the fuel pump diaphragm, thus the inlet
check valve (in fuel pump) is opened and fuel (from
fuel tank) is drawn into fuel pump.
Downward motion of the piston forces the fuel/air mixture
out of the crankcase into the cylinder. This motion
also forces out on the fuel pump diaphragm, which, in
turn, closes the inlet check valve (to keep fuel from returning
to fuel tank) and opens the outlet check valve,
thus forcing fuel to the carburetors.
CHECKING FOR RESTRICTED FUEL FLOW CAUSED
BY ANTI-SIPHON VALVES
While anti-siphon valves may be helpful from a safety
stand-point, they clog with debris, they may be too
small, or they may have too heavy a spring. Summarizing,
the pressure drop across these valves can,
and often does, create operational problems and/or
powerhead damage by restricting fuel to the fuel
pump and carburetor(s). Some symptoms of restricted
(lean) fuel flow, which could be caused by use
of an anti-siphon valve, are:
 Loss of fuel pump pressure
 Loss of power
 High speed surging
 Preignition/detonation (piston dome erosion)
 Outboard cuts out or hesitates upon acceleration
 Outboard runs rough
 Outboard quits and cannot be restarted
 Outboard will not start
 Vapor lock
Since any type of anti-siphon device must be located
between the outboard fuel inlet and fuel tank outlet,
a simple method of checking [if such a device (or bad
fuel) is a problem source] is to operate the outboard
with a separate fuel supply which is known to be
good, such as a remote fuel tank.
If, after using a separate fuel supply, it is found that
the anti-siphon valve is the cause of the problem,
there are 2 solutions to the problem; either (1) remove
the anti-siphon valve or (2) replace it with a solenoidoperated
fuel shutoff valve.
Testing
Install clear fuel hose(s) between fuel pump and carburetor(
s). Run engine, and inspect fuel passing thru
hose(s) for air bubbles. If air bubbles are found, see
“Air Bubbles in Fuel Line,” below. If air bubbles are
NOT found, see “Lack of Fuel Pump Pressure,” continued
on next page.
Troubleshooting Fuel Pump
PROBLEM: AIR BUBBLES IN FUEL LINE
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Low fuel in fuel tank. Fill tank with fuel.
Loose fuel line
connection.
Check and tighten all
connections.
Fuel pump fitting loose. Tighten fitting.
A hole or cut in fuel line. Check condition of all
fuel lines and replace
any found to be bad.
Fuel pump anchor
screw(s) loose.
Tighten all screws
evenly and securely.
Fuel pump gasket(s)
worn out.
Rebuild fuel pump.
PROBLEM: LACK OF FUEL PUMP PRESSURE
Possible Cause Corrective Action
An anti-siphon valve. Read “Checking for
Restricted Fuel Flow,
Caused by Anti-Siphon
Valves” preceding.
Air in fuel line. “Air Bubbles in Fuel
Line”, preceding.
A dirty or clogged fuel
filter.
Clean or replace fuel
filter.
The fuel pickup in fuel
tank clogged or dirty.
Clean or replace pickup.
Worn out fuel pump
diaphragm.
Rebuild fuel pump.
Defective (hole or crack)
check valve(s) in fuel
pump (unlikely).
Rebuild fuel pump.
Broken check valve
retainer.
Rebuild fuel pump.
Pulse hole plugged. Remove fuel pump and
clean out hole.

Troubleshooting Fuel Pump
(continued)
PROBLEM: LACK OF FUEL PUMP PRESSURE
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Hole in pulse hose
(1 pulse hose).
Replace pulse hose.
Loose pulse hose. Tighten connection.
Boost diaphragm gasket
distorted or out of place.
Check seal between
mating surfaces where
“rib” divides pulse
chamber – gasket must
align with rib; check for
distorted gasket. Align
or replace gasket if
necessary.
Fuel Pump Components (Design 1)
NOTE: In fuel pump reassembly, remember that respective
diaphragms go against the mating surfaces
of the fuel pump body, and respective gaskets are between
the diaphragms and end caps. Gaskets should
always be replaced on fuel pump assembly.

a - Fuel Pump Base
b - Fuel Pump Body
c - Chamber Plate
d - Gasket, Base
e - Fuel Filter – Inline
f - Gasket, Pulse Chamber
g - Diaphragm, Fuel Pump
h - Retainer, Check Valve
i - Check Valve
j - Check Valve Rubber Disc
k - Main Compression Spring End Cap
l - Main Compression Spring
m- Boost Diaphragm
n - Boost Chamber Gasket
o - Boost Compression Spring End Cap
p - Boost Compression Spring
q - Retainer, Check Valve
r - Check Valve
s - Check Valve Rubber Disc
t - Check Valve Assembly

Carburetion
Fuel System Troubleshooting
Troubles, that are caused by items 1-thru-5, listed below,
may give the impression that a problem exists in
the fuel system:
1. Spark plugs
2. Ignition spark voltage
3. Cylinder compression
4. Reed valves
5. Ignition timing
Troubleshooting Charts

PROBLEM 1: ENGINE TURNS OVER BUT WILL NOT
START OR STARTS HARD WHEN
COLD
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Improper starting
procedure.
Check procedure, as
outlined in “Operation
and Maintenance
Manual.”
Fuel tank empty;
improperly mixed fuel;
contaminants (water,
dirt, etc.) in fuel.
Check fuel in fuel tank
and replace or add.
Fuel tank air vent closed
or restricted.
Air vent must be open
and free from
contaminants.
A pinched or restricted
fuel line.
Check, and replace as
needed.
Dirty or restricted fuel
filter.
Check, replace or clean.
Enrichener valve not
operating.
Check enrichener
system. (Refer to
“Enrichener System”
following.)
An inlet needle (in
carburetor) that is stuck
open or closed. (A
needle stuck open, will
cause a flooding
condition. A needle stuck
closed, will prevent fuel
from entering carburetor.)
Remove, clean, or
replace.
Anti-Siphon valve
restricting fuel flow.
Refer to “Checking for
Restricted Fuel Flow
caused by Anti-Siphon
Valves”, following.
See “Checking for Restricted Fuel Flow caused
by Anti-Siphon Valves”, page 3A-1.
PROBLEM: ENGINE FLOODS
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Dirt or foreign particles
are preventing inlet
needle from seating.
Flush out inlet seat and
clean inlet needle.
Worn inlet needle. Replace.
Punctured float. Replace.
Incorrect float setting. Reset float.
PROBLEM: ENGINE RUNS TOO LEAN
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Carburetor is loose. Air
leaks past mixing
chamber cover.
Tighten bolts securely.
Tighten cover or replace
gasket.
Fuel level too low. Reset float level.
Clogged high speed jet. Check and clean.
Restricted fuel flow to
carburetor.
Check fuel lines and
filter(s) for restricted
flow.
Incorrect high speed jet. Refer to main jet chart
and replace with proper
jet.
Idle mixture set too
lean.
Adjust to run richener.
Air leakage into fuel
system.
Check fuel line
connections, hose
clamps, fuel pump, and
fuel outlet tube (located
in fuel tank) for loose
fittings.
Anti-Siphon valve
restricting fuel flow.
Refer to “Checking for
restricted fuel flow
caused by Anti-Siphon
valves.”
PROBLEM: ENGINE RUNS TOO RICH
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Fuel level too high. Reset float to correct
level.
Carburetor floods. See preceding “Engine
Floods”
Idle nozzle air holes
plugged.
Blow out with
compressed air.
Restricted air flow. Check cowl air inlet and
carburetor for
obstructions.
Main Fuel Jet loose. Retighten Jet.

PROBLEM 1: ENGINE IDLES ROUGH AND
STALLS
PROBLEM 2: ENGINE RUNS UNEVEN OR
SURGES
PROBLEM 3: ENGINE WILL NOT ACCELERATE
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Fuel tank air vent closed
or restricted.
Check - Air vent must
be open all-the-way and
free from restrictions.
A pinched, cut or
restricted fuel line; also
loose fuel line
connection.
Check all fuel lines and
replace as needed.
Check and tighten all
fuel line connections.
A dirty or restricted fuel
filter.
Check, replace, or clean
all fuel filters.
Restricted filter in fuel
tank.
Clean by rinsing in
clean lead-free gasoline
or kerosene.
Improperly mixed fuel;
contaminants (water,
dirt, etc.) in fuel.
Check fuel and replace,
if necessary.
An inlet needle (in
carburetor) that is either
stuck open or closed. (A
needle, that is stuck
open, will cause a
flooding condition. A
needle, that is stuck
closed, will prevent fuel
from entering
carburetor.)
Remove and replace
with new inlet needle.
Incorrect idle mixture
adjustment.
Re-adjust.
Damaged fuel pump
diaphragm.
Replace.
Carburetor is loose. Tighten bolts securely.
Chamber cover leaking
air.
Tighten or replace
gasket.
Off idle holes plugged. Blow out with
compressed air.
Main nozzle or idle
nozzle air bleed holes
plugged.
Blow out with
compressed air.
Improper main jet or
restricted jet.
Clean or replace with
proper jet (refer to “Main
Jet Chart”).
Damaged reed(s). Inspect reeds as
outlined in Section 4A.
A crack in the fuel
pick-up outlet tube
(located in fuel tank).
Replace.
A crack in the fuel outlet
tube (located in fuel
tank.)
Replace.
Anti-Siphon valve
restricting fuel flow.
Refer to “Checking for
Restricted Fuel Flow
Caused by Anti-Siphon
Valves,” following.
PROBLEM: FUEL BLOW-BACK OUT OF
CARBURETOR
Possible Cause Corrective Action
Chipped/Broken
(reed-block) Reeds
Replace Reeds.
PROBLEM: ROUGH IDLE
If related to reed-block,
indicates excessive
preload in reeds.
Replace Reeds.
PROBLEM: CAN’T REDUCE ENGINE RPM TO
SLOW IDLE
Multiple Chipped Reeds. Replace Reeds.
Checking for Restricted Fuel Flow
Caused by Anti-Siphon Valves
While anti-siphon valves are helpful from a safety
standpoint, they clog, they may be too small, or they
may have too heavy a spring. The pressure drop
across these valves can, create operational problems
and/or powerhead damage by restricting fuel. Some
symptoms of restricted (lean) fuel flow, are:
1. Loss of fuel pump pressure
2. Loss of power
3. High speed surging
4. Preignition/detonation (piston dome erosion)
5. Outboard cuts out or hesitates upon acceleration
6. Outboard runs rough
7. Outboard quits and cannot be restarted
8. Outboard will not start
9. Vapor lock
Any type of anti-siphon device must be located between
the outboard fuel inlet and fuel tank outlet. A
method of checking [if such a device (or bad fuel) is
a problem source] is to operate the outboard with a
separate fuel supply which is known to be good.
If, it is found that the anti-siphon valve is the cause of
the problem, either 1) replace the anti-siphon valve or
2) replace it with a solenoid-operated fuel shutoff
valve.


1973 1990 Johnson Evinrude 2 to 40 HP Service Manual Outboard

Johnson - Evinrude Service Manual Application: 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990 Outboard For 2, 2.5, 4, 4.5, 5, 6, 7.5, 8, 9.5, 9.9, 15, 18, 20, 25, 28, 30, 35, 40 HP (Horsepower - Horse Power) Outboards Marine Engine Johnson/Evinrude 2Stroke 2-Stroke Two Stroke & 4Stroke 4-Stroke Four Stroke models.

1973-1990 Johnson Evinrude Service Manual 48 235 HP Outboard & Sea Drives

Johnson - Evinrude Service Manual Application: 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990 Outboard & Sea Drive (Sea Drives) For 48 50 55 60 65 70 75 85 88 90 100 110 115 120 135 140 150 175 185 200 225 & 235 HP (Horsepower - Horse Power) Outboard & Sea Drive Marine Engine Johnson/Evinrude 2Stroke 2-Stroke Two Stroke & 4Stroke 4-Stroke Four Stroke models.

1973-1991 Johnson Evinrude Outboard 60 HP-235 HP Workshop Manual 2-STROKE

1973-1991 Johnson Evinrude Service Repair Manual Application: 60 Hp, 3 cyl 1986-1991 - 65 Hp, 3 cyl 1973 - 70 Hp, 3 cyl 1974-1991 - 75 Hp, 3 cyl 1975-1985 - 85 Hp, V4 1973-1980 - 90 Hp, V4 1981-1991 - 100 Hp, V4 1979 1980 - 115 Hp, V4 1973-1984 - 115 Hp, V4 1990 1991 - 120 Hp, V4 1985-1991 - 135 Hp, V4 1973-1976 - 140 Hp, V4 1977-1991 - 150 Hp, V6 1978-1991 - 175 Hp, V6 1977-1983 - 175 Hp, V6 1986-1991 - 185 Hp, V6 1984 1985 - 200 Hp, V6 1976-1983 - 200 Hp, V6 1986-1991 - 225 Hp, V6 1986-1991 - 235 Hp, V6 1978-1985

1990-2001 Johnson-Evinrude 1 HP To 70 HP Service Manual 2-Stroke & 4 Stroke

Johnson - Evinrude Service Manual Application: 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 Outboard For 1-Hp, 2-HP, 2.3-HP, 3.3-Hp, 3.5-HP, 4-HP, 5-HP, 6-HP, 6.5-HP, 8-HP, 9.9-HP, 10-HP, 14-HP, 15-HP, 18 JET, 20-HP, 25-HP, 25D, 28-HP, 30-HP 35-HP, 40-HP, 45-HP, 50-HP, 55-HP, 60-HP, 65-HP, 70-HP (Horsepower - Horse Power) Outboards Marine Engine Johnson/Evinrude 2Stroke 2-Stroke Two Stroke & 4Stroke 4-Stroke Four Stroke 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 models.

1992-2001 Johnson Evinrude 65-300 HP Service Manual Application:

4-CYLINDER ENGINE/MOTOR MODELS/YEARS COVERED: 65HP-65 HP Jet 1992, 1993, 1994 & 1995 - 80HP-80 HP Jet 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 & 1997 - 85HP-85 HP 1992 to1995 - 88HP-88 HP 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 & 1996 - 90HP-90 HP 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 & 1998 - 100HP-100 HP 1992 to 1997 - 112HP-112 HP SPL 1994 to 1996 - 115HP-115 HP 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 & 1998 - 75HP-75 HP 2001 - 80HP-80 HP JET 1998, 1999, 2000 & 2001 - 90HP 90 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 & 2001 - 100HP 100 1998 to 2001 - 105HP 105 Com 1997 to 2001 - 115HP 115 1995 to 2001 - 120HP 120 1992 to 1994 - 130HP 130 1994 to 2000 - 135HP 135 2001 - 140Hp 140 1992 to 1994

6-CYLINDER ENGINE/MOTOR MODELS/YEARS COVERED: - 105HP 105 JET 1992-2001 - 135HP 135 2001 - 150HP 150 1992-2001 - 175HP 175 1992-2001 - 185HP 185 1992-1994 - 200HP 200 1992-2001 - 225HP 225 2001 - 250HP 250 1999-2001

8-CYLINDER ENGINE/MOTOR MODELS/YEARS COVERED: 250HP 250 1992-1998 - 300HP 300 1992-1995

 


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